Mockingjay, the concluding novel of The Hunger Games Trilogy sold 450,000 copies on its first week, nevertheless, majority of its reading fanbase asserted that it was below par with the two previous books, a disappointment.
First, let us see the bigger picture in here:
Mockingjay, in all its tarnished glory, presented a whole different plot compared to the two preceding books. The book opened with District 12 burned into smithereens. Katniss on her most depressed state. Peeta, Johanna and Enobaria held captive by the Capitol. Finnick, mentally disoriented. District 13 materialized as implied in the previous books. In the simplest sense, Mockingjay’s a break to the endless, barbarous atmosphere of The Hunger Games, introducing an unfamiliar angle: District 13 vs. The Capitol. On my part, it’s, if not perfect, the most appropriate way to end the trilogy, an uprising against the Capitol.
We see more of Gale on this book. We see his true intentions for the Girl on Fire. On the contrary, we see less of Peeta, more of Gale. More of Katniss-Gale friendship/love story. This book is meant to confuse readers on their decision on who deserves to be Katniss’ man. I have to admit that I reached a deadlock with a slight slant on Peeta, of course.
People die, people make decisions. People die, people make crucial decisions for the sake of Panem. People die, some of my favorite characters died.
As the book comes to a close, we will realize that Collins ended the book that way because she wants us to see that The Hunger Games, Catching Fire and Mockingjay is not all about Katniss, the Girl on Fire, that it’s not about bow and arrows, that the trilogy revolves around a war, a decade in the making, brutal in its most superlative form, a darker representation of how we survive in life, how we decide and suffer the consequences of what we do. How we lose the most precious thing in our lives, how we have nightmares afterwards and eventually cope and adapt on what is left in our hands.
Mockingjay's a great book, but I could never include it on the list of the books that I love. At first, it was hard, trying to find the silver lining of the book, but it dawned on me, just as I expected, that yes, the book’s on the bottom if ranked with the other two books, but, I think it’s the most admirable of the three when it comes to the theme that it underscores: agony, pain and recuperating after a thousand hits of the first two.

Mockingjay, the concluding novel of The Hunger Games Trilogy sold 450,000 copies on its first week, nevertheless, majority of its reading fanbase asserted that it was below par with the two previous books, a disappointment.

First, let us see the bigger picture in here:

  1. Mockingjay, in all its tarnished glory, presented a whole different plot compared to the two preceding books. The book opened with District 12 burned into smithereens. Katniss on her most depressed state. Peeta, Johanna and Enobaria held captive by the Capitol. Finnick, mentally disoriented. District 13 materialized as implied in the previous books. In the simplest sense, Mockingjay’s a break to the endless, barbarous atmosphere of The Hunger Games, introducing an unfamiliar angle: District 13 vs. The Capitol. On my part, it’s, if not perfect, the most appropriate way to end the trilogy, an uprising against the Capitol.
  2. We see more of Gale on this book. We see his true intentions for the Girl on Fire. On the contrary, we see less of Peeta, more of Gale. More of Katniss-Gale friendship/love story. This book is meant to confuse readers on their decision on who deserves to be Katniss’ man. I have to admit that I reached a deadlock with a slight slant on Peeta, of course.
  3. People die, people make decisions. People die, people make crucial decisions for the sake of Panem. People die, some of my favorite characters died.
  4. As the book comes to a close, we will realize that Collins ended the book that way because she wants us to see that The Hunger Games, Catching Fire and Mockingjay is not all about Katniss, the Girl on Fire, that it’s not about bow and arrows, that the trilogy revolves around a war, a decade in the making, brutal in its most superlative form, a darker representation of how we survive in life, how we decide and suffer the consequences of what we do. How we lose the most precious thing in our lives, how we have nightmares afterwards and eventually cope and adapt on what is left in our hands.

Mockingjay's a great book, but I could never include it on the list of the books that I love. At first, it was hard, trying to find the silver lining of the book, but it dawned on me, just as I expected, that yes, the book’s on the bottom if ranked with the other two books, but, I think it’s the most admirable of the three when it comes to the theme that it underscores: agony, pain and recuperating after a thousand hits of the first two.

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  6. taterstat said: I wish that i could of spoken those words before you. There is no way of putting my feelings about this book into the words that you have written. for that, i thank you.
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  9. smallunderthesky said: Well said!
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  11. orangeone reblogged this from 500daysofkissingmypillow and added:
    looked at meaning...book from this perspective. It’s rather interesting…
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