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My Second Dan Brown Book. Typical Dan Brown Book. It’s great. Yeah it is.

Well, I’m not really a fan of Dan Brown, why? Because all of his books are so predictable. Yeah. All of the prologues contain a certain death of some significant someone. And the story revolves on that death. And yeah, I’m never gonna forget Dan Brown’s trademark, the assassins on each and every book. I like the assassins on this book, the Delta Three, I want to be just like them. LOL. So here I come.

My Ridiculously Simplified Synopsis : Scientist discovers a hoax about alien life found in the Arctic that was planned in order to validate NASA.

When a desperate U.S. President seeks the help of a smart and beautiful intelligence analyst, a handsome oceanographer who also anchors a popular television series, a world famous astrophysicist, a paleontologist, and a glaciologist, it can only mean serious business. Include a literally groundbreaking discovery by NASA and a shrewd senator who takes an anti NASA stance in his campaign for the presidential candidature and you have a plot that thickens as you turn every page. Throw in an armed secret force whose only business is “elimination” and you have a racy thriller. Top it off with a bit of idealism, romance, and family—you have an intense drama. And when Dan Brown serves all these in a dish with the hint of a shocking deception, you have a book that can be made into a movie, any day.

For those of us who think that space science is magic and NASA is heaven, there is a lot of disillusionment in store, as Dan Brown portrays the woes of running a government agency as against the more lucrative privatization option. This disillusionment takes the lights out of a magic conjured by our “astronomical” dreams. The deception also manages to dampen the satisfaction of having read a good book.

As against his penchant for art, architecture, history, and religion as revealed in his earlier books (Angels and Demons and The Da Vinci Code), Dan Brown embarks on a crusade where he pitches geography and science, loaded with interesting facts, against cutthroat power politics. All in all a good read, albeit a long drawn out end.

I recommend this book for the lovers of science and for all the geeks out there.

P.S.

I’m really gonna be thrilled if this will be made into a movie. Well, I’m gonna wait.

My Second Dan Brown Book. Typical Dan Brown Book. It’s great. Yeah it is.

Well, I’m not really a fan of Dan Brown, why? Because all of his books are so predictable. Yeah. All of the prologues contain a certain death of some significant someone. And the story revolves on that death. And yeah, I’m never gonna forget Dan Brown’s trademark, the assassins on each and every book. I like the assassins on this book, the Delta Three, I want to be just like them. LOL. So here I come.

My Ridiculously Simplified Synopsis : Scientist discovers a hoax about alien life found in the Arctic that was planned in order to validate NASA.

When a desperate U.S. President seeks the help of a smart and beautiful intelligence analyst, a handsome oceanographer who also anchors a popular television series, a world famous astrophysicist, a paleontologist, and a glaciologist, it can only mean serious business. Include a literally groundbreaking discovery by NASA and a shrewd senator who takes an anti NASA stance in his campaign for the presidential candidature and you have a plot that thickens as you turn every page. Throw in an armed secret force whose only business is “elimination” and you have a racy thriller. Top it off with a bit of idealism, romance, and family—you have an intense drama. And when Dan Brown serves all these in a dish with the hint of a shocking deception, you have a book that can be made into a movie, any day.

For those of us who think that space science is magic and NASA is heaven, there is a lot of disillusionment in store, as Dan Brown portrays the woes of running a government agency as against the more lucrative privatization option. This disillusionment takes the lights out of a magic conjured by our “astronomical” dreams. The deception also manages to dampen the satisfaction of having read a good book.

As against his penchant for art, architecture, history, and religion as revealed in his earlier books (Angels and Demons and The Da Vinci Code), Dan Brown embarks on a crusade where he pitches geography and science, loaded with interesting facts, against cutthroat power politics. All in all a good read, albeit a long drawn out end.

I recommend this book for the lovers of science and for all the geeks out there.

P.S.

I’m really gonna be thrilled if this will be made into a movie. Well, I’m gonna wait.

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